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ASHLEY RAHIMI SYED

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Ashley Rahimi Syed is currently a video producer and brand marketer at Airtable.

Previously, she was a videographer in the art department at Cult Records. She was also a news video producer at Group Nine Media. Her work has been featured in Rolling Stone and New York Magazine, and published in Teen Vogue.

Email her or connect  on  LinkedIn.

AIRTABLE


> BOILER ROOM CASE STUDY
> DIRECTOR, PRODUCER, AND EDITOR
> JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION CASE STUDY
> DIRECTOR, PRODUCER, AND EDITOR

> “SURPRISE YOURSELF
> DIGITAL AD FOR INSTAGRAM, FACEBOOK, AND YOUTUBE
> WRITER, DIRECTOR, AND PRODUCER
> AIRTABLE PRODUCT INTRO
> USED IN ONBOARDING FLOW
PRODUCT DEMO SERIES
> CREATED FOR B2B SALES ENABLEMENT

CULT RECORDS


︎“HUMAN SADNESS” BY JULIAN CASABLANCAS + THE VOIDZ
︎PARTIAL DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY


TYRANNY ALBUM PREVIEW FOR JULIAN CASABLANCAS AND THE VOIDZ
> PARTIAL DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND EDITOR

> “FLASHBACKS, MEMORIES, AND DREAMS” BY THE VIRGINS
> PARTIAL DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY AND EDITOR

GROUP NINE MEDIA


> BASSLET PRODUCT REVIEW
> DEVELOPED THIS SERIES FOR SEEKER
> WRITER, DIRECTOR, EDITOR

> “ERASED MEMORIES” CREATED FOR SEEKER
> WRITER, ANIMATOR, EDITOR

PERSONAL


Young, Colored & Angry was a single-issue online magazine and live exhibition created by Ashley Rahimi Syed and Elliott Brown, Jr. It exclusively featured People of Color, and focused on issues of racial identity. Over 40 artists and academics were involved, hailing from NYC, Detroit, Chicago, Los Angeles, Minnesota, London, Palestine and Accra. YCA debuted in April 2015. The online magazine has amassed over 10 thousand unique views, and the live event was attended by hundreds of guests.

> As Editors-in-Chief of the magazine, Ashley and Elliott determined the subject matter, tone and style. They engaged all of the contributors, pitched ideas to writers, copy-edited and fact-checked every article, and produced the graphics and imagery. As curators, they worked with artists to develop and execute each individual piece, and determined how to best present them in the space.

> This project was featured in New York Magazine and VICE, among others.


> What’s it like to be a Middle Eastern woman? I went to Times Square to find out.
> Made under the guidance of Wafaa Bilal.


> Make me your Arabian Fantasy was an interactive, paper-doll-inspired web game, users could dress the artist in three costumes that represented the limited and fantastical depictions of Middle Eastern women in western media. Two extra costumes, representing the identities often adopted by Middle Eastern women as a defence to bigotry, were also included.

> In Make you your Arabian Fantasy, these stereotypes were turned into literal carnival attractions to mimic and amplify their absurdity.  Three of the costumes were made into 6-foot-tall, head-in-the-hole cut-outs that allowed the participant to “match” with my persona in the web game.

> This piece was made under the guidance of Wafaa Bilal and featured in Teen Vogue.